An Analysis of The Simpsons

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JL Zenor
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An Analysis of The Simpsons

Post by JL Zenor » Fri Sep 01, 2017 3:01 pm

This is a long video that analyzes The Simpsons as it changed from the interesting and funny show it used to be, to something with lazy writing.

From a writing perspective, this actually shows some tips on writing good humor that is more than easy humor with one liners, and shows how to write satire.



So, what do you think?
Hugh Howey wrote:In everything you do as an author, work harder than anyone else around you. Want it more than you want anything else in life. Even if fortune doesn’t favor you, you’ll have zero regrets, and you’ll create something you’re proud of.
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RonfarZ3
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Re: An Analysis of The Simpsons

Post by RonfarZ3 » Sun Sep 03, 2017 4:26 am

Hmmmm . . . an interesting analysis that actually pinpoints where the Simpsons went "wrong." I'm more interested in the IMDB graph since there were a few seasons after the HD switch in Season 20 that were actually pretty good, albeit not as good as the early seasons.

As for the humor bit, the video does make a good point about one-liners and hits the nail on the head about why I don't like The Big Bang Theory.
I think if we're to write comedy, the "layered" approach is something that will keep people laughing as each time they re-read it, they find something new about it that's funny. If you can slap a laugh track at the end of your punchline and that's it, it probably needs a re-write.

I also appreciate the video's exploration of how to do good satire. Of the plentitude of books I've read recently, a lot seem to be trying for satire but are either too heavy-handed or too subtle (usually the former). A lot of satire relies on bringing ideas to their logical conclusions, thus exposing the main flaw in the initial topic being satirized. "Catch-22" is probably the best example of this, showing how the bureacracy of the military was essentially putting enlisted soldiers into a state of slavery, but in a way that wasn't obvious from the start (which is a problem with the heavy-handed approach). Often, comedy and satire are linked together, but the "joke" of the satire has to be true on an emotional level in order for the reader to laugh at it because they know it's true (and thus prevent themselves from crying because of the truth).

But, yeah. Good find!
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JL Zenor
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Re: An Analysis of The Simpsons

Post by JL Zenor » Sun Sep 03, 2017 6:22 pm

Cool, glad I'm not the only one to find some use out of this. :D
Hugh Howey wrote:In everything you do as an author, work harder than anyone else around you. Want it more than you want anything else in life. Even if fortune doesn’t favor you, you’ll have zero regrets, and you’ll create something you’re proud of.
Check out my books: Rite of Passage

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